BILOWZ ASSOCIATES INC. is an award winning landscape architectural design firm with a proven philosophy: "Creating Design with Harmony & Balance."
Our company blog, Annie's Gardening Corner, takes a sneak peek at how we balance our own love for everything green + a place to find inspiration, garden ideas and landscape design tips.

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Saturday, November 30, 2013

November’s Summer

day 12 of 26 days of kindness
For anyone waking up early, there was a beautiful waning crescent moon sitting low in the morning sky. Even when the warm summer breeze has long been gone, there’s always something like this crescent moon surrounded by thousands of stars lighting up the darkness. It reminds me of that May moment, walking in the woods and spotting that first lady‘s slipper. Beneath a pile of crumpled leaves and moss, this beautiful orchid appears.  

On this last day in November, day 12 of 26 Days of Kindness, I chose this archived image of the lady’s slipper to honor Grace McDonnell. Grace loved school, the beach and painting. She dreamed of being an artist and wanted to live on Martha's Vineyard.

So why choose this dainty orchid that graces our woods in May? An artist always looks for what others may not see; painting it with color and life so others can enjoy that special moment, too. The lady’s slipper is also typically spotted late May, just before the Memorial Day weekend, which is always the first true sign of summer. We pack up the beach gear, head to the ocean. We find sea shells and other treasures on the shore. We feel the sand squishing between our toes.
Day 12 of 26 days of kindness
On this cold November 30th, let's honor Grace with kindness today. Remember Mother Teresa’s words as we bestow a gift of warmth and kindness upon a friend or stranger. “We know only too well that what we are doing is nothing more than a drop in the ocean. But if the drop were not there, the ocean would be missing something.”

What links these small gifts of the woods and sea? A drop of kindness can be that speck of light, color, that one small piece of hope that is painted into someone else’s day. Create a November summer in honor of Grace. 

Click on the links for the event and FB page for the 26 days of kindness. Make this last day of November one of warmth in honor of Grace and Newton, CT.  Make it a November summer.

Images by Ann Bilowz © 

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Friday, November 29, 2013

Sun in My Face

Day 11 of 26 days of kindness
Mary Oliver, one of my favorite poets, starts today’s 11th day of 26 days of kindness. “Hello, sun in my face. Hello you who made the morning and spread it over the fields...Watch, now, how I start the day in happiness, in kindness.” On this day after Thanksgiving, do not forget to begin your day in happiness, in kindness to honor James Mattioli. He enjoyed many activities such as swimming, baseball, basketball and playing on his iPad.

On this 11th day of kindness to honor James, I chose this perennial, Russian Sage, Perovskia atriplicifolia from the archived images. Though it may be difficult to see the beautiful flush of lavender-blue flower spikes in the August light, this is one of those perennials you can spot growing in some of the most difficult of places. Drought tolerant and deer resistant, the Russian Sage blooms profusely throughout the summer months. It thrives in full sun and for a plant combination works well with ornamental grasses, succulents and Drift® Roses. It is equally as beautiful growing tall all by itself. 

On this November morning, as the sun shines brightly, it reminds me of this beautiful flush of lavender-blue flower spikes and aromatic foliage reaching high in the August 14th sun. It reminds me that when you start your day in happiness, you can spot kindness in the most difficult of places. Make this day after Thanksgiving brighter with a splash of kindness and summer sunshine in honor of James.    

Click on the links for the event and FB page for the 26 days of kindness. Start your day in happiness, in kindness. Keep the sun in your face.

Image by Ann Bilowz © Russian Sage, Perovskia atriplicifolia

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Giving Thanks & Kindness

Day 10 of 26 Days of Kindness
Happy Thanksgiving to all. If you took a minute to come here and read this, it is much appreciated. Those who follow know that these recent garden and design posts have been dedicated to the 26 days of kindness. Thanksgiving happens to fall on day 10. And on this November 28th, we honor Jesse Lewis. He has a tall order to fill as his day falls on this first, difficult holiday for the Newtown, CT families to face but Jesse seems to be an appropriate pick. He was a brave, heroic little boy who loved riding horses, math and toy soldiers.

Here is the image I have chosen for Jesse. Horses, which he loved, symbolize freedom and strength. The Sunflowers represent tall pride and appreciation. Tesio, the most successful breeder of Thoroughbreds once said this about horses. “A horse gallops with his lungs, perseveres with his heart, and wins with his character.” With all the acts of kindness today, big or small, let this town of Newtown, CT find a bit of healing, strength and perseverance in the very animal, the horse and what it represents to a brave boy who loved these special creatures so much.       

Here is where you can find the event and FB page for the 26 days of kindness. On this first Thanksgiving without their loved ones, do not forget one small act of kindness in honor of Jesse Lewis and the families of Newtown, CT.  To Chris, Jen & Mattie, a special Happy Thanksgiving- my family connection to Newtown, CT.

Image/Design by Bilowz Associates Inc. ©  

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Simple as Apple Crisp

day 9 of 26 days of kindness
Hopefully today’s archived image of an ornamental crabapple brings a bit of brightness to your morning. Here in Apple country there’s nothing but buckets of rain. With tomorrow being Thanksgiving, let’s move right into why this image was my pick today. For those following, it is the 9th day of 26 Days of Kindness. Today we honor Chase Kowalski.

What did Chase like to do? He enjoyed many outdoor activities like running and riding his bike. He loved baseball and was a member of Cub Scouts. In honor of Chase, I chose to make today light and easy with an Apple Crisp recipe that is tried and true. But you’re not off the hook so soon. There is a point here about kindness, too. Some people may think in order to do an act of kindness, well, it must be elaborate. Let’s use apples to make the point.

When baking an apple pie you use the same ingredients as you do in an apple crisp. The main ingredient, your apples being kindness, can still be baked into something simple or elaborate; it’s a matter of choice, talents, timing or resources. Whether you make an apple pie or tart or something as simple as an apple crisp, the taste is still phenomenal. Heck, you can bake an apple in the oven with a little cinnamon and it still tastes just as good. In other words, however you cook them apples, sharing the kindness is what these 26 days and beyond are all about. No matter how you peel, cook or serve them, do it with a smile in honor of Chase. 

And before we go to the Apple Crisp recipe, this quote from the Field of Dreams exemplifies what we can only hope today’s many acts of kindness bring to the Kowalski family. “People will come, Ray. The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game: it's a part of our past, Ray. It reminds us of all that once was good and that could be again. Oh...people will come, Ray. People will most definitely come.” And so will the acts of kindness this day before Thanksgiving.

Old-Fashioned Apple Crisp

½ to ¾ cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon
¼ cup Lemon Juice
6 cups pared and sliced all-purpose apples (about 2 ½ pounds)
1 cup quick-cooking oats, uncooked
½ cup unsifted flour
1/3 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/3 cup margarine or butter, melted
Cream or ice cream, optional 

Preheat oven to 350®F. In large bowl, combine granulated sugar, cornstarch, cinnamon and lemon juice. Mix well. Add apples and mix well. Turn into 8-inch square baking dish. In small bowl, combine remaining ingredients. Hold the cream or ice cream until the end. Sprinkle the crumble over the apples. Bake 30 to 40 minutes until apples are tender. Serve warm with cream or ice cream or as is.

A little tidbit on this year’s apple crop – 30% higher yield than last year so hopefully there will be plenty of apples at this year’s Thanksgiving tables. And here is where you can find the event and FB page for the 26 days of kindness to honor those 26 lives lost last December in Newtown, CT.

Image by Greg Bilowz © Malus ‘Robinson’ Robinson Crabapple

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Nature’s Thanksgiving Collage

On this November 26th, two days before Thanksgiving, we honor Catherine Hubbard. There is a group of animal friends that a special young girl would like us not to forget about. Yes, for those who have been following, today is day 8 of 26 days of kindness.Catherine loved animals, insects, too, She even had business cards for her own shelter. In honor of Catherine, today's post is titled ‘Nature’s Thanksgiving Collage.’








I chose this quote from Gemma Malley because it resonates what I read about this young girl with a beautiful heart. “He said that we belonged together because he was born with a flower and I was born with a butterfly and that flowers and butterflies need each other for survival.” Remember Catherine’s words to the butterfly. “Tell all your friends that I am kind.”  

Perform one small act of kindness today in her honor. Here is where Catherine’s dream lives on. +Catherine Violet Hubbard Foundation

Images by Ann Bilowz ©

A few additional links: Some tips from the ASPCA for your pets during this Thanksgiving Holiday. Catherine was the recipient of the ASPCA Tommy P. Monahan Kid of the Year award this November. 

The event and FB page for the 26 days of kindness to partake in acts of kindness as a hurting town in Connecticut approaches these holidays and December 14th, 2013. 

And if you want to create a natural habitat in your garden, here is a useful link from the +National Wildlife Federation.

And you can also check the archives and follow this blog for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook, follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Monday, November 25, 2013

Monday’s Sunshine

Day 7 of 26 days of Kindness
If you are waking up in New England this morning, you may think you overslept and woke up in Antarctica. It’s probably pretty chilly, too in Denver. Just saying as the Patriots won that game in overtime and it wasn’t looking good in the beginning. But back to the #gardenchat for this Monday before Thanksgiving. With the soil locked up solid, chances are most of your pots and shovels are tucked away in the garden shed. 

No worries, though. Need some instant sunshine? There are plenty of bulbs perfect for planting indoors. Plus they make awesome holiday gifts. So here’s a blast from the past of the Annie archives. This last minute fall shopping list of bulbs thrive in the indoors during these chilly dormant months when color is desperately needed. There’s also pot size and tips for planting so this post is worthy of another look.

For those who follow on a regular basis, yes, this is day 7 of 26 Days of Kindness. Today we honor Madeleine F. Hsu. She loved those simple things we take for granted - to read, run and dance. So to honor Madeleine, today’s post is a bit more fun and uplifting. It’s like the 7th inning of a baseball game, when we all get up and take a stretch. But that doesn’t mean we are off the hook. There’s a game to finish. There are more days ahead and acts of kindness that can only help with the healing in Newtown, CT. Bringing some sunshine in honor of Madeleine can only keep the warmth and kindness spreading. Plus, if you made it through yesterday, today is just a tad easier. There’s a lot less wind.

That is why I picked today’s archived image. It is an Amaryllis blooming outdoors in the late evening sun this past summer. Looking out the window today, you might be deceived. The sunshine is bright but the minute you open the door, the frigid air hits you. There is no escaping it. It is cold outside.
So as we gaze upon our exterior landscape, the ground may be frozen but we can still plant seeds, bulbs, or perform a simple act of kindness. Bring the sunshine indoors. Do it in honor of Madeleine. Read, run and dance. It is amazing the sunshine you might bring to someone who needs it.

Here is the event and FB page to bring extra rays of sunshine to Newtown, CT before Thanksgiving. The holiday seasons, though we expect them to be full of cheer are often the most difficult to work through so never underestimate the power of a simple act of kindness. It may be those simple things we take for granted - to read, run, and dance. As Voltaire once said, “Let us read and let us dance - two amusements that will never do any harm to the world.” Nor will an act of kindness. 

Sorry Madeleine, there are lots of words. But I know you liked to read. Hope you like today's flower.  

Image by Ann Bilowz © Amaryllis blooming in the late evening sun

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Sunday, November 24, 2013

Sunday’s Flowers

Day 6 of 26 days of kindness
Yesterday, before this artic air moved across our region, I discovered this one Black-eyed Susan in the garden. Uncovered when cleaning up the last of the leaves and cutting back the perennial beds, this blossom was discovered, all by itself. Covered by a light snow this morning and drooped over from the wind and cold, this seems like the perfect flower image for today. It’s the language of flowers I shall rely on again.

In the language of flowers, the Black-eyed Susan represents encouragement. It is also an extremely resilient plant. On this day 6 of 26 days of kindness, today's acts of kindness are to honor Dylan Hockley. 

Dylan was a “beautiful butterfly” who loved the color purple, trampolines and plain spaghetti with garlic bread. So on this Sunday, I hope you will visit the event and FB page later to share an act of kindness to honor Dylan. Every little bit of encouragement helps to heal the wounds of Newtown, CT. 

As Franklin D. Roosevelt once said, “When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.” So one last flower from the archives in honor of Dylan; a Purple Balloon Flower to give encouragement or a lift to someone in need today.
Dylan Hockley
Image by Ann Bilowz © Rudbeckia hirta, black-eyed Susan in the November garden
Image by Ann Bilowz © Platycodon grandiflorus Balloon Flowers  

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Saturday, November 23, 2013

Magical Moments & Places

Earth Goddess of Imaginary Worlds
If you are lucky enough to visit the +Atlanta Botanical Garden, you might recognize this magical work of art above. This particular figure, known as ‘Earth Goddess’ is part of the ‘Imaginary Worlds’ display. She is truly in a league of her own for being particularly inviting for all ages, young and old. Plus you don’t have to be an industry buff to appreciate its beauty. This display of art captures so much - movement, life, flowing and breathing that makes this Goddess truly feel alive. 

Yes, today’s image kicks off day 5 of 26 Days of Kindness. On this Saturday, we honor Ana Marquez-Greene. She loved to sing, dance- especially to a fast beat and was going to start piano lessons. She also loved Disney, especially Princess Tiana from ‘The Princess and the Frog’. This image reminds me of just that - something very magical and fairytale-like. But there is always a caveat - what I love most about this particular piece of garden art is how alive it feels to the visitor. It is full of plants intertwined with many other design elements but its most moving feature is the water flowing from her hand. It reminds me of all the kindness and good deeds that are being done today in memory of Ana and all the acts of kindness performed earlier this week.   

John O’ Donohue once said, “If you send out goodness from yourself, or if you share that which is happy or good within you, it will all come back to you multiplied ten thousand times. In the kingdom of love there is no competition; there is no possessiveness or control. The more love you give away, the more love you will have.”

Love isn’t a fairy tale if you give it away. Give your love and kindness  to someone who might need a magical moment to lift them up in honor of Ana Marquez-Greene. Again, the event and FB page if you want to help heal the wounds of Newtown, CT.

© Image by Ann Bilowz (Earth Goddess at Atlanta Botanical Garden)
If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Friday, November 22, 2013

Friday Cheerfulness

Day 4 of 26 days of kindness

It’s the Friday before Thanksgiving so my lucky guess for today is that there are fewer and fewer thoughts about our exterior spaces and more emphasis on indoor activities. With the weather changing and our gardens getting ready for that yearly nap, there’s been a lot of digging from my archive images. Today’s photo serves as a quick reminder of the language of flowers. 

Why choose Crocuses? These bulbs symbolize cheerfulness and who can’t use a bit of that on this rainy Friday? When we plant bulbs in the fall, this is often what our eyes spot first. As our  garden starts to wake up, these lovely blossoms begin popping from the earth in late winter/early spring. The cheerfulness starts to spread and soon all the beauty of spring is upon us.

Today's image from the Annie archives has a bit more magic and meaning on this November morning. Today might be one of the last days we can actually plant bulbs outdoors before the ground freezes. Remember there are several bulbs that make wonderful holiday gifts to force in the middle of winter, adding cheerfulness throughout the season. Amaryllis is one of my favorites. 

But back on track for those following daily; you know that today is day 4 of 26 Days of Kindness. On day 4, we honor Lauren Rousseau. She is the first teacher/adult and she had many interests including music, dance and theater. She loved teaching children and was like a big kid herself.  

The reason this image seems fitting today, well, what matters most is what you see. But I see one unique Crocus amongst all the beautiful white blossoms, like a teacher often is to her students. Today might be a perfect day to thank a teacher, a mentor, or just someone who takes the time to extend some extra knowledge to you in your workplace. Or maybe it’s someone who opened your eyes to something you never would have dared to try and you tiptoe around the ways to say thank you. As G.B. Stern reminds us during this month of November, “Silent gratitude isn’t much use to anyone.” So get out those pens and write a thank you.

Once again for anyone just joining in, you can find the FB event and Page created by Ashley Petersen. And for those who do read this post on a regular basis, I am making an exception to my rule. Usually this is a daily blog but not on the weekends. Because these days of kindness don’t stop for weekend or holiday breaks, neither can I. Be sure to check back here if you want to continue these acts of kindness over the weekend and throughout the Thanksgiving holiday.

And thank you to Mrs. Mahoney. You are the reason I write.

P.S. Sorry for any run-on sentences or other grammatical errors within my posts; I may not be editor material but one thing you taught me in English was to never lose my creative spirit.

© Image by Ann Bilowz – First Crocus Blossoms

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Planning Your Color Combinations

Olivia Engel - Day 3 of 26 days of kindness
A stocked perennial garden can use soft or powerful color combinations and if you love to be daring in your color schemes, you might amaze yourself at what you can create. But the beautiful combination to any perennial garden is that the following spring/summer/fall, you know the beauty of your perennials will reappear. 

And so it has been with the 26 days of kindness. It is a continuum; one gift of kindness is planted and it continues to reappear. Just like our perennials - with each season producing more blossoms, structure and beauty. That may seem like a basic 101 of perennials to avid gardeners but many of us still love annuals and opt out of adding more depth with our perennial beds. We might even forget that our perennials are the true workhorse and backbone to our garden beauty. Plus, it’s a return on your garden investment when they come back year after year. 

But now it’s time to officially kick off day 3 of 26 days of kindness. Today, we honor Olivia Engel. Her family has said she loves pink and purple, dancing, art and had a great sense of humor. If you are just jumping on board, here is the event page or the FB Page to join, post or just view.  

For today's image, I chose one from the summer archives of a butterfly floating on the purple coneflowers. This morning, there wasn’t a perfect person that immediately came to mind to be the recipient of this 3rd day of kindness. I believe today’s might be dancing in the sunlight like the butterfly, an opportunity to celebrate and honor Olivia with a gift of needed kindness, that like this butterfly just appears.

As Steve Maraboli reminds me on this third day of kindness, “Sometimes it's the same moments that take your breath away that breathe purpose and love back into your life.” A random act of kindness is as simple as that.

© Image by Ann Bilowz - Echinacea purpurea (eastern purple coneflower) with butterfly

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

To Touch Every Flower This November

day 2 of 26 days of kindness
Pardon the rerun. You may recognize this image and quote from an October post but Leo Buscaglia’s words send a bigger and brighter message this morning. Today is day 2 of 26 Days of Kindness. Leo’s words state it best. “Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around.” This illustrates what Buscaglia was most passionate about, speaking about love, which often is associated with the color red.

On day 2, two children from Sandy Hook are being remembered, Daniel Barden and Noah Pozner. Daniel wanted to be a firefighter when he grew up. And Noah, well, today would have been his 7th birthday. Noah has a twin sister. For her, Noah is no longer by her side. 

Red, symbolizing love, intertwines Daniel and Noah together, still touching every flower when we choose to do an act of kindness and love in honor of Daniel and Noah. The rest is up to you. How will you choose to touch a flower today?    

Here is the FB event or page if you want to participate. Ashley Petersen chose to do something that she possibly underestimated could touch so many people. In a few short weeks, these pages have grown by leaps and bounds and with that, so have the acts of kindness. 

There is one quick gardening tip to share today. It’s a clip from the +National Gardening Association. One of the things NGA promotes is youth and school gardening. We feel very strongly about connecting our youth to touch every flower. “Protect the trunks of young trees and fruit trees from the teeth of hungry voles, mice, and rabbits. Make cylindrical cages out of wire hardware cloth to encircle the trunks. Cages should be 18-24 inches above the anticipated snowline, if possible, for protection from rabbits. Sink the bottom edge of the wire 2-3 inches down into the soil so that critters can't tunnel under. You can leave cages in place year round; just be sure to make them larger than the diameter of the trunk to accommodate the tree's growth.”

© Image by Ann Bilowz
If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Replicating Pink

Charlotte Bacon 26 days of kindness

C. Joybell C. reminds us that “Pink is a beautiful color, because it is one of the colors that the sun makes at twilight and in the dawns.” And if you were one of the lucky ones to see the sunrise this morning, there was plenty of beautiful pink stretching across the sky.

So on this November 19, 2013, we kick off the first day of kindness. Each day until December 14th an act of kindness will be done in memory of each of the 26 lives lost in Newtown, CT. It’s been mentioned a couple of times in my daily blogs, including yesterday’s post.

My connection to Newtown, CT; my nephew and his family live there. His wife grew up in this Connecticut town, forever changed last December. Maybe some of you are connected in other ways or maybe you just love the color pink. This color can also be very symbolic for the fight on breast cancer. 

So as we move through our busy days, let’s try to replicate pink. All acts of kindness done today are in honor of Charlotte Bacon. She loved this color. Charlotte also had a love for animals and wanted to be a veterinarian. 

So rewind to your first thought this morning as your toes hit the floor running. Too often, we open up the complaint department and bellyache until we look at someone else. There is always someone in need of an extra hand, a kind word, a cup of coffee, a beautiful pink Rose. It may only be a small gesture to you but to them, it might make all the difference in their world. 

So just for today, replicate pink. Having a hard time? Not your color? Close your eyes and picture spring. Envision the first pink blossom that pops up in your garden or the nearby park. Then soften the bristly edges of your day and turn a difficult moment for someone else into a gift of kindness instead. Do it in honor of Charlotte Bacon. Then go to the Ashley Petersen’s FB or event page and if you like, you can share your gift(s) of kindness there or quietly throughout your day, just replicate the color pink.  

© Image by Ann Bilowz - Paeonia lactiflora 'Sarah Bernhardt' drooping in the spring rain

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Monday, November 18, 2013

Light is Not Heavy



Simply put, when we illuminate our outdoor spaces our choice of light should not be heavy. Lighting should be exactly that – light. It should be inviting, create a mood and highlight features that a visitor entering your exterior spaces may not see, specifically at night. 

The above image is an example of a design detail we recently completed for an Oceanside project. Many of us may not think about fire being an element of lighting when we typically illuminate our landscapes but it accomplishes all the criteria above. And here are some reasons why this feature works so well:

It is gas-fired, which means it is a quick on/off. 
It is adjustable, which means the flame can be set for high or low.
But most importantly, it is safe and clean-burning. In some states you cannot burn wood. With this element, there is also no mess to clean or smoke in your eyes, especially in a site-specific place like the ocean, where prevailing winds can make a fire pit almost unusable. The image below displays why this lighting element works so well.

Eric Roth Photography

So that’s the light bulb moment on a Monday morning. As Arthur Conan Doyle once said, “It may be that you are not yourself luminous, but that you are a conductor of light. Some people without possessing genius have a remarkable power of stimulating it.” That’s my job every morning - to give you a boost of light in this wonderful world of design. But the power behind this light - Greg Bilowz, he is the beacon of great design. 

And speaking of light, do not forget about the launch of #26days of kindness, which begins tomorrow. Join in to make these numbers grow. Click here and here to check the pages of a young girl, Ashley Petersen making a difference when it comes to lighting up her town.

© Copyright note: this image and design has been developed by and is the property of Bilowz Associates Inc. and should not be reproduced in any manner nor are they to be assigned to any third party without the expressed written permission and consent of Bilowz Associates Inc.©
Credits:
Master Plan and Landscape Design – Bilowz Associates Inc. 
Photography by Eric Roth 
Landscape Construction by Francisco Tavares Inc. 
General Contractors: Cataldo Builders 
 
If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Friday, November 15, 2013

Resiliency


Steve Maraboli states that “Life doesn’t get easier or more forgiving, we get stronger and more resilient.” One of the major topics at the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) #ASLA2013 annual conference is resiliency, which begins this morning in Boston. This topic was announced in October in remembrance of the one year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy but with this latest devastation hitting the Philippines, resiliency is on the forefront.

While the industry’s focus on resiliency is timely, these subjects have been at the forefront of the landscape architecture world for quite some time. It was a little over a week ago that one of my posts, Tuesday’s L.A. Lesson spoke about changes with the remapping of flood zones. So be ready for a 'to be continued' segment on many of these major points.

And if anything teaches resiliency, it’s the understanding of Mother Nature and what she has in store for us. Being prepared is what makes the difference. As Maraboli reminds us, ‘Getting strong and more resilient’ keeps us moving forward. And though you may be tired of what I deemed the #Bostonstrong Rose, it’s amazing how resilient this one Rose has been, even when the weather has dipped well below its tolerance level.

Look forward to seeing everyone at the conference.

Image by Ann Bilowz ©

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Thursday’s Twizzle


A recent article written by Eugene Fram states that there are ‘four diverse groups calling for the U.S. educational system to assure the public that college graduates have acquired critical thinking skills. These groups want graduates to be much better at analyzing, evaluating and creating information-based viewpoints, sometimes called “facts-based decision making.” ' So when I caught this headline on Twitter this morning, “Tired of Thinking? Google Says We Won’t Have To,” I had to watch the video. The clip is fascinating. Not too long and tedious like the Ted Talks. It is much more interactive and it definitely holds the dwindling attention spans we're now accustom to in this technology era.

I’ve also been reading a book written by Amanda Ripley titled, “The Smartest Kids in the World and How They Got that Way.” I always find these types of books interesting, especially when it suggests that the U.S. may not be the strongest in education compared to its other counterparts in the world. I won’t reveal any info other than it is a good read and it should make you think a bit more about the article and video above. Where will our next group of critical thinkers originate from? 

Why should any of the above be of interest especially if you come to this post expecting gardens, design or something related to the great outdoors? First, it gives your own thinking skills a twizzle on this Thursday morning. But I must admit my own bias to a belief I hold firm to - that engaging children at an early age in the outdoors is a natural and autonomous way to give them a jumpstart on these critical thinking skills. Everything else will follow – the reading, the math, the sciences, the arts. The crux of critical thinking begins at a very young age. So how will you develop those young minds that need to forge forward in a very rapidly changing world?  

Aristotle said it best about critical thinking. “It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.”

Image by Ann Bilowz ©

The little girl in the photo is my niece when she was a toddler. She is now a high school guidance counselor helping make a difference in many young girls' lives.

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Only Results


On this chilly November morning, rather than just a wordless Wednesday image, let’s toss a few words out there to warm you up. Here’s one Wednesday word to chew on, think about, write it on paper, text it to a friend – then take a step backwards and ask yourself, what first thoughts jump into your head when you hear the word ‘Commitment’ (and not in the sense of relationships). I ask myself quite often, “Am I just old-fashioned or is there really less and less of it - that ‘dig in your heels’, ‘I’m sticking to it’ attitude? Is it merely a passing interest or is there a commitment factor to seeing results? There’s always a big sigh when a curve ball catches you off guard or someone forgot to mention there might be some heavy lifting or grunt work involved.

So how does this relate to our landscape? Oh, yes. There’s always a garden twist. Creating places that matter to us, like our landscape and garden spaces, well, heck yeah, that takes a full bucket of commitment. Not manure or peat moss but commitment and there’s no filler or soil amendment that can fix that one. Some of the most beautifully designed landscapes often become a moment captured in color when the commitment factor is dropped by the wayside. There’s nothing worse than something created that was not enjoyed.

And a general rule of thumb - when you enjoy your outdoor spaces, maintaining them becomes part of the fun. Ken Blanchard writes this about that ‘C’ word. “There's a difference between interest and commitment. When you're interested in doing something, you do it only when it's convenient. When you're committed to something, you accept no excuses - only results.” 

It is a perfectly valid question to ask yourself when you undertake any design or your own do-it-yourself project. It’s also something to assess when you’re about to dive headfirst into the next garden or design trend. It's more than just a pretty image. It begins with a Capital 'C'. It’s being committed to the process. It’s being committed to the results.

Image by Greg Bilowz © Bilowz Associates Inc.

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Garden State of Flux


Plato once said, “All is flux, nothing stays still.” How true that is, especially in our gardens and with this changing New England weather. Just yesterday, there was warmth and sunshine. Today, there are snowflakes dancing on the last of the #Bostonstrong Roses. There were still two buds left at the end of October and this is what remains.

So enjoy these last moments of fall even if the days are dabbled with a mix of sunshine, rain, or snow. And one last thought. It’s not too late – plant your bulbs. From the garden state of flux, nothing stays still.

Especially Border collies - always on the go.

Images by Ann Bilowz ©

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Monday, November 11, 2013

Thank a Veteran

Thank A Veteran
If you missed last Friday’s post, In 84,600 Seconds, it’s today’s holiday reminder to thank a Veteran. Here are some of the major businesses who will be thanking and celebrating our Veterans today so if you know someone who is a veteran, please share this post with them. And if you cross paths with someone in military uniform, saying two words, ‘Thank You’ can make all the difference in their day.

 Remembering our country’s veterans – thank you for your service.

Image - Bilowz Associates Inc. © 

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Friday, November 8, 2013

In 84,600 seconds

Yesterday, late afternoon there was a double treat in the sky. Some of us were entertained with a spectacular rainbow that lit up the fall foliage as another performance was taking place on the opposite side. There was this incredible sunset occurring in the western sky at exactly the same time. This morning it felt like an encore performance - the light, the foliage, the depth of the early morning sky equally as beautiful. Moments like these pop up when we least expect it. Suddenly, we stop. We appreciate the moment.
Mary Oliver states it best in her poem, ‘Snow Geese.’ “I held my breath as we do sometimes to stop time when something wonderful has touched us...” If you pay attention and appreciate the outdoors, there is always something special about the November sky. November is also a month where we set aside a day to celebrate our veterans, to thank them. Unfortunately, this holiday is filled with retail and one-day sales rather than its true purpose – to say thank you and give honor to our veterans. 

Saying thank you in its simplest form is an act of kindness, which leads me to my final Friday thought. Last December, there was a wave of kindness that went viral when journalist, Ann Curry called on people all over the world to perform 26 acts of random kindness to honor the lives lost at Sandy Hook Elementary School. This year, there is a similar effort occurring in Newtown, CT. “Try to do one act of kindness, big or little, for 26 days with the last day being December 14th. Each day from November 19th to December 14th please share what your act of kindness was!” 

Let’s start with being thankful for brilliant rainbows and beautiful sunsets and sunrises. Use Monday to acknowledge and say thank you to our service men and women; our scores of U.S. veterans. As William Arthur Ward once said, “God gave you a gift of 84,600 seconds today. Have you used one of them to say thank you?” Or be kind? Random acts of kindness waiting to happen. Use your 84,600 seconds wisely. It starts with saying thank you. The extra step - finding someone who might least expect receiving your #26Acts of random kindness.

P.S. How’s your November garden? 

Images by Greg Bilowz ©

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Thursday, November 7, 2013

The Need to Know About White Pines & Ribes


With a cold taking the wind out of my writing sails, today’s post is a quick alert but certainly not one to overlook. A recent AP bulletin written by Rik Stevens updated the news industry about a mutant form of white pine blister rust. Caused by the fungus Cronartium ribicola, white pine blister rust first hit the United States in the early 1900s. Its host plant (called ribes) now has a brand new mutation going on. Typical of when blight occurs, the industry responds by developing disease resistant varieties. But here’s the crux of this article in a nutshell. What was developed in the fruit growing industry as resistant varieties of Ribes (currants and gooseberries are a Ribes sp.) may no longer be immune to white pine blister rust. As this article states, it is estimated that up to half of the plants previously thought to be immune have been found to be infected. That’s huge!

Because many of the people who visit this blog are interested in fruit bearing plant material, particularly those that fall under the ‘niche’ market category, it is equally important to keep up on the latest insect and diseases problems, including blights which can be devastating to an important species such as white pines. Many of the local farms and suppliers of Ribes have been mentioned in past posts. It’s a story for another day on how this affects a farm’s crops or the adjustments a supplier makes when selling these particular plant materials.

As always – pay attention to what you plant in your garden and keep up on its scientifically related plant news. Why you might ask? Just leave it to the experts. Sometimes it doesn’t trickle down until it ends up in your neighborhood. A moratorium was placed on planting currants and gooseberries last November in New Hampshire. Click here for a UNH cooperative extension bulletin with some useful information on the need to know about White Pines and Ribes.

As Albert Einstein so brilliantly stated, “Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.” So take note of this reemerging issue and what you plant but more than anything else – do not be apathetic thinking it’s not your problem. It’s a need to know for the upcoming year.

Image – Bilowz Associates Inc.© Photo taken by Greg Bilowz

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Make Autumn Your Spring


The Swedish writer, August Strindberg once said, “Autumn is my spring.” Literally just weeks away from winter, it’s a last glimpse of fall foliage in yesterday’s afternoon light. One could be saddened by these thoughts as the upcoming season of hibernation or migration can be a bit hard on the garden spirit.

But look closely. There are always a few hot pockets in the garden. Here is the perfect example - fresh Rosemary. One container was brought indoors to overwinter but the two still planted in the garden are holding onto its aromatic fragrance because of its protective sunny spot. One of its great uses - as a cut flower in this Ball jar plus it gives the kitchen some afternoon hints of spring. And if you need a simple wreath idea for your Rosemary twigs (especially if you’re into a little early winter festivity), here’s a pinterest clip worth clicking on. It’s the perfect evening autumn task as you sip on a cup of tea.
 
And alas, if you’re in a holding pattern on what to do with your landscape, now is an ideal time to think design. Don’t procrastinate. There’s no time to sit on your thoughts or your underused plot of land. Think makeover - make autumn your spring.Make Autumn Your Spring
 
Images – Bilowz Associates Inc.©  

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Tuesday’s L.A. Lesson


William Gibson states, “When you want to know how things really work, study them when they’re falling apart.” Yikes, that could be applicable to a number of things in society today but here’s one that is receiving some attention in the news lately. It’s one that all homeowners should understand because in some way, shape or form, these changes can slowly trickle down and before you know it, you may be part of these legislative changes. It is already making impacts on landscape architecture and how we design. So what is it?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is in the process of remapping flood zones. If you live or are building in a coastal location, you may already be aware of its impact. But don’t think it stops at coastal zoning. Visit the Floodsmart.gov site and you can find useful information that all homeowners should be paying attention to regarding reassessments on properties in ‘high-risk areas and if it reflects a true flood risk’. Understanding topography or low lying flood zones may seem irrelevant to most but it all matters when legislation like this appears. Just for giggles, enter a zip code on the Floodsmart site and see if you recognize why the city or town listed may be listed as part of this remapping legislation. It will make you remember, “Oh, yeah. It was just a few years ago when those streets were flooded for days.” Or you’ll think about that pristine reservoir as it sits on a hill but realize its devastation if any part of its dam let go. Remember the William Gibson quote. “When you want to know how things really work, study them when they’re falling apart.” Unfortunately, we learn our lessons too late.

Let's consider storm frequency and intensity. What once was considered a 25-year storm event now occurs more frequently. You may remember reading about that tidbit here. It's also been mentioned in previous posts how federal legislation impacts state and local municipalities when it comes to storm water management regs and development of a property. Now it's time to pay attention to the remapping of flood zone areas. It’s been a long time coming and there’s clearly been some resistance because it can change the playing field. But like so many things as it relates to design and development, you can’t fool with the laws of Mother nature as to when she hits or where. With the devastating damage of Hurricane Sandy still fresh in our memory bank, this post serves as a wake-up call. Pay attention, especially as this year was extremely quiet on the hurricane front. L.A. Lesson for this November Tuesday – Eyes on the forefront and be prepared for the storms ahead. 

P.S. Hopefully Blogger's email subscriber function is working this morning and sends you yesterday’s post as well.

Image by Ann Bilowz ©  

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Monday, November 4, 2013

A Fall Veggie Boost

 
If you didn’t plant a late season crop like Broccoli or Brussel sprouts or you don’t intend on getting any garlic bulbs in the ground over the next week, you may be under the false pretense that everything in the veggie garden is all set for next spring. But not so fast – there’s always a useful garden tip and one you can’t overlook if you take your veggies seriously. The most important step you can never skip is to clean up all your dead plants, dispose of them and any additional debris that leaves pathogens to emerge in the soil each spring. This can be caustic to your vegetable garden, big or small, so it should be cleaned properly so as not to spread plant diseases.
There’s one last winterizing step for the veggie garden, which is to add a winter cover crop (i.e., winter rye). Why is this recommended, specifically for a sizeable vegetable garden? This extra boost helps stabilize the soil and provides a layer of green manure, adding a supplementary organic matter that gets tilled into the soil next spring. The only thing you should be aware of – don’t wait too long come spring to till it in. You want this extra layer mixed in your soil before it goes to seed.

So it’s a quick wrap up on this November morning with a Jane Shellenberger quote. “Our most important job as vegetable gardeners is to feed and sustain soil life, often called the soil food web, beginning with the microbes. If we do this, our plants will thrive, we’ll grow nutritious, healthy food, and our soil conditions will get better each year. This is what is meant by the adage, ”Feed the soil not the plants." Have a great Monday. Enjoy your week.
 
Top Image by Ann Bilowz – The Last of the New Dawn Rose in Bloom this weekend.
Bottom Image by Ann Bilowz © Last of the Parsley and garden clean-up

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.

Friday, November 1, 2013

It’s the Form That Counts


Orhan Pamuk states, “It's not the content, but the form of thought that counts.” So on this balmy but windy first day of November, it’s an image looking up. It’s the last of the fall foliage and it’s my favorite color, yellow. This photograph suggests the final moments of light and sunshine on this overcast Friday. For those turning back the hands of time, we can’t forget that this is the weekend we set our clocks back an hour. Get use to the darkness a bit earlier in your afternoons. That’s why planting bulbs become so darn important when we are looking for those first signs of spring. If you missed Tuesday’s garden reflections, there’s a list of fall tips worth checking out for this weekend.

Yes, it’s been a long, whirlwind week here in #Soxnation so Friday’s content may be short on word count. But it seems that images always garner the most looks. But if you need a tad more ‘story’, here’s an inspiring article. Take a look at how +Cornell University’s Landscape architecture program is inspiring local teens. It’s a Friday lift-off. Enjoy your weekend.

Image by Ann Bilowz © 11 1 13 Last of the Fall Foliage

If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.
 

About Me

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Check in for your daily share's worth of garden inspiration, landscape architecture and design tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! We invite you to contact Bilowz Associates, Inc., or to browse our portfolios. Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.  You can also find us back on our Google+ Business Page. (Landscape architects/Landscape Design/serving Massachusetts and New England.) Visit our landscape architectural design firm's website where creating design with balance and harmony is our story. http://www.bilowzassociates.com/

© 2009

© 2009 Ann St. Jean-Bilowz/Bilowz Associates Inc. (including all photographs, unless otherwise noted in Annie's Gardening Corner are the property of Bilowz Associates Inc. and shall not be reproduced in any manner nor are they to be assigned to any third party without the expressed written permission and consent of Bilowz Associates Inc.)