BILOWZ ASSOCIATES INC. is an award winning landscape architectural design firm with a proven philosophy: "Creating Design with Harmony & Balance."
Our company blog, Annie's Gardening Corner, takes a sneak peek at how we balance our own love for everything green + a place to find inspiration, garden ideas and landscape design tips.

To browse our award winning landscape design portfolios, click on our company website at WWW.BILOWZASSOCIATES.COM

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Every Hundredth of a Second

 

Marc Riboud, a French photographer reminds me that “Taking pictures is savoring life intensely, every hundredth of a second.” So for today, can we savor something I happened upon yesterday? Catching a pair of turkey vultures in action I considered pretty neat. Finally, some bird photos for the repertoire even though the subject matter cooperated very nicely. 


Don’t miss these hundredths of a second. Absorb the changing air and grab some early spring images of what’s out, flying about or starting to sprout. It’s an easy way to snap back into warmer temperatures predicted for this holiday weekend. Savor these early spring moments that come but once a year when everything is starting to wake up from its long winter sleep.

Images by Ann Bilowz

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/ 

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Knock, Knock, Knocking

 
 
Spring blossoms are truly knocking on our doors. Here's proof above. But in keeping with wordless Wednesday, it’s a simple image of a special dwarf Rhododendron with its perfectly shaped buds. A Rhododendron yakushimanum 'Yaku Angel' that soon shall be displaying its beautiful blossoms of white. In the meantime, the white backdrop of snow indicates what is still to come. 

Mary Baker Eddy’s quote sums up this spring awakening best. “When angels visit us, we do not hear the rustle of wings, nor feel the feathery touch of the breast of a dove; but we know their presence by the love they create in our hearts.”

Image of a Rhododendron degronianum subsp. yakushimanum 'Yaku Angel' bud by Ann Bilowz

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Spring Start-Up

 
 
Henry David Thoreau has encouraging words to reign in a prompt spring start-up. “An early-morning walk is a blessing for the whole day.” It gets the circulatory pumps moving but you might also find lots of spring surprises. Though it may be a challenge navigating the snow piles, let alone find any crocuses popping from the frozen ground, one thing you won’t be able to deny is the bird activity right now. So when you, yourself are in doubt about the season, these feathery creatures are most certain of it. So get your prompt spring start-up with that early morning walk. You may discover a tiny blossom, a budding tree or simply a bird’s beautiful spring song. 

P.S. Bluebirds are a favorite and I’ve seen quite a few in the oddest places. Pay attention for these bright blue bursts of color. As for today’s image, well, capturing birds is certainly not my forte. So hence a borrowed photo from someone who can.

Image of a Bluebird from Pinterest (Wish I could find the photographer to credit the beautiful work. But oh is the dilemma of this social media tool. Can’t even come close to where this image started from but I am sure it is a gifted photographer.) 

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/


Monday, March 25, 2013

Spring Break

 

“I glanced out the window at the signs of spring. The sky was almost blue, the trees were almost budding, the sun was almost bright.” ~ Millard Kaufman

Image by Greg Bilowz ©

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Friday, March 22, 2013

More than Just Blossoms

 

On this third day of spring, this Chinese Proverb reminds us to "Keep a green tree in your heart and perhaps a singing bird will come." Today’s image (taken from our archives) is one of our favorite specimen trees, the Sweet Bay Magnolia. The chickadee that landed there late last night reminded me of its summer blossom, its fragrance and all its beauty. 

A short excerpt from Mary Oliver’s Poem ‘October’ wraps up today's garden thought.

“What does the world
mean to you if you can’t trust it
to go on shining when you’re
not there?” 

Today’s post is in memory of David Plamondon. Though your blossom seemed short-lived, your sweetness remains for those you left behind. 

Image of a Sweet Bay Magnolia by Greg Bilowz ©

http://blog.bilowzassociates.com/2011/06/have-sweet-bay-of-day.html (For more information about one of our favorite trees from the archives.)

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Thursday, March 21, 2013

A Long Lost Friend

 

Carl Sandburg once said, “The moon is friend for the lonesome to talk to.” But do you consider when that friend, the moon is full or new? Keeping in contact with that acquaintance may be important when it comes time to consider whether to prune, plant, fertilize, you name it. The moon and its phases influence more than our high tides. But can it weigh into the success of our gardens?

Some say, (old school gardeners) to prune any woody plant material on the descending moon (the phase between the full moon and the new moon.) It’s a given that the moon has an effect on water; i.e., the tides in the ocean. So let’s look at the basis of this pruning theory and the moon’s phases. When you prune during the descending moon, the plant material’s flow rate of moisture (sap flow) is at its lowest. The plant can cauterize these pruning wounds much quicker when water/moisture in the plant is at its lowest flow rate (or cycle). It weeps less; less moisture is lost, which is important to the overall health of the plant. 

With gizmos, gadgets and apps that can track the whole gamut (high and low temps, humidity, forecast, storm warnings, and of course, keeping track of our friend, the moon) there’s absolutely no reason to overlook what we might be able to control. Let's not forget this long lost friend, the moon and all its wonderful phases, especially launching into a new planting season. It's full speed ahead.

The descending moon cycle is coming soon. And should you or your garden be lonesome, it’s time to sharpen the shears. Get ready to prune and croon to the moon.

Image of a winter moon by Ann Bilowz

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Happy Gardening. Annie

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Spring’s Hope

 

Yes, it is here after all the countdowns – the first day of spring. So with this wordless Wednesday image is a short story about hope, spring’s hope, that after yesterday’s snowstorm, spring is truly here. Even if we can’t quite see it yet, we are faithful in our love for spring. We know it because it is.

“Aboard a ship that was sinking, a woman stood with her blind husband as she grasped for the rescue boat. But an officer pushed the man toward the back of the line, yelling, “Women and children only in these boats!” The wife pleaded with him, explaining that he was blind and that she wouldn’t get on the boat if her husband couldn’t go with her. The officer than waved them both into the rescue boat. The man’s hope was in his wife whom he could not see, but he trusted her in faith because he knew her and knew the love she had for him.”

And so it is, despite for some, this first spring morning is glistening with snow. We soon shall see the lovely blossoms. We know it because it is.

As we venture into our first official day of spring, let's keep Emily Dickinson’s words close to heart.

“Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul
And sings the tune without the words
And never stops at all.”

Image by Ann Bilowz ©

Above quoted story is an excerpt from ‘A Daybook of Grace’

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Storm Relief

 

When you think storm relief, it's hard to imagine beyond what’s landing on the doorstep this last winter morning. But spring is just another dozen or so hours away, right? So let's get to it - time to think and scheme what you can plant this season. Now let's narrow it down to what fits with your climate, site conditions, and soil.

As promised, if you caught the image of yesterday’s post, http://blog.bilowzassociates.com/2013/03/the-linear-and-inspirational-mix.html the unusual plant is, did you guess it? It’s a Sea Holly (that’s the common name) and as you can see, it is perfect for bouquets. But that wasn’t cut from the perennial border this past weekend. For a shot of a previous summer, let’s take a peek back at an archived image. (See above.)

This Sea Holly variety is called Amethyst Sea Holly (Eryngium amethystinum). With an abundance of varieties to choose from, what’s superb about the Sea Holly is that it’s drought-and salt-tolerant, plus a Zone 4-9. You know what that means – this perennial can fit a lot of conditions. Plus it is unique in form and the versatility, well, that’s another biggie when choosing your plant material for your colorful borders.

So until we get past this last winter day, that’s the storm relief tip with a Lily Tomlin quote to call it a wrap. “For fast-acting relief try slowing down.” Good words to heed as we navigate this last winter storm. And just think. Tomorrow is spring.

Planting Combination and Image by Greg Bilowz © Amethyst Sea Holly (Eryngium amethystinum) and Red-leafed Dracaena (Cordyline baurei Red Leaved Dracaena)

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Monday, March 18, 2013

The Linear and Inspirational Mix

 

Soil, well, it’s a lot like the people who might happen upon this blog. It’s comprised of various types so a general rule of thumb is to test and amend the mix if we must. With that said, yesterday I spied a follower who sheepishly admitted to following my posts. Being an engineer and a guy, he needed to tell me he’s a linear type so the inspirational entries, although he still takes a peek, isn’t what this burly sort needs most. “I’m looking for technical.” So here’s one for those linear types straight from the Annie archives. No sense reinventing the wheel when we’ve already created the spoke. http://blog.bilowzassociates.com/2011/02/soil-call.html

P.S. I’m glad for all types of soil and readers. And I appreciate each and every single one who comes here. So now that the Monday morning thank you note is checked off the list, the signature part of this blog is always wrapping in a quote. John O’Donohue, an Irish poet and philosopher clarified this linear and inspirational mix best. “When time is reduced to linear progress, it is emptied of presence.” There’s one for you to ponder over the course of your Monday.

And for all of the New England readers out there, we must face this last winter storm. It could make that first day of spring look a bit wet or white, depending on your location. Do yourself a Monday favor and buy a bouquet of flowers for yourself or someone special. It makes every day look a bit like spring.   

Image by Ann Bilowz - A fresh bouquet of flowers

Do you know what the unusual-shaped flower is in the image? If you follow here, you should. It’s one of our favorites. Follow tomorrow – it could be another Annie archive posting to jog your memories. For those who know, I hope you followed the recommendations and planted it (or intend to plant it) in your perennial borders. 

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/
Happy Gardening. Annie 

Friday, March 15, 2013

Friday Trends and Tidbits




The Garden Writers Association Foundation (GWAF) just released its 2013 Winter Gardening Trends Research Report and with it is some food for thought.

“Among the 68 million gardening households that have a lawn, garden or grow plants in containers, 81.5% (~55.5 million households) have grown edible plants (fruits/vegetables/herbs) since 2009. Growing methods used by this group include: 35.3% grew edible plants in the ground; 15.6% grew edible plants in containers; and 30.6% grew edible plants both in the ground and in containers.

Among the ~55.5 million households that have grown edible plants since 2009, 91.4% (~50.7 million households) grew edibles in 2012. Only 8% of households growing edible plants since 2009 did not grow in 2012, and the main reasons given were: took too much time (40.9%), lost interest (22.5%), efforts were unsuccessful (19.0%), moved to a location where gardening wasn’t possible (17.8%), too expensive (12.6%) or too much work (6.4%).

Among all U.S. households, 51.9% (~57 million) report they anticipate growing edible plants this year, representing an expected 11.3% increase in households growing edible plants for 2013. 

Those who plan to grow edible plants in 2013 state their top 5 challenges are: Time (35.7% ); Insect & disease control (30.8%), Wildlife control (26.0%), Irrigation (23.6%) and Cost (13.0%).”


So for everyone reading, where do you fit with these numbers? Why do you plant the garden edibles or for others, why not? Somehow my guess would be beyond this survey sample that time would be given as the number one reason. And then next in line - losing interest; it seems pretty typical for any hobby one undertakes if you don’t ensue it with a spark of enthusiasm. So if you want to be part of the edible trend, commit yourself to a passion well worth the freshness. For everyone else, please support your local farmer.  

Of course I must wrap this up with a Friday quote. From one of my favorite musicians, John Mayer. “If you had started doing anything two weeks ago, by today you would have been two weeks better at it.”  How true. So the question is will you be committing yourself to an edible garden in the next two weeks? Planning counts so let’s get to it. 

Footnote: The above quoted information is an excerpt from a weekly newsletter for +GWA Members, of which our company, Bilowz Associates Inc. are members of and have access to a free copy of all the survey reports. 

Image by Ann Bilowz © (From our photo archives) Cherry Tomatoes – Everyone can grow them!

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Thursday, March 14, 2013

The Integral Parts of a Whole

 

Unless we’ve been holed up without a calendar, we can all sense that the season of spring is coming soon. With that comes an urgent need to redecorate the outside rooms. Are outdoor projects on your spring list? Today’s quote and lesson comes from the words of St. Francis Assisi.  

“He who works with his hands is a laborer.
He who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman.
He who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.”

So here’s the Annie-urism of this post. How does this quote relate to your outdoor projects? The integral parts of a landscape vision always include all three; labor, craftsmanship and artistry. It’s what creates a balanced yet beautiful outdoor vision. And if your landscape requires building a team of talent requiring all these integral parts, if you leave out the artist, you leave out the heart of the garden and the outdoor living space.  

Image by Ann Bilowz © (From our photo archives)

Today’s quote and image are chosen to express our best wishes and success for +Pope Francis. 

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Happy Gardening. Annie

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Wednesday’s Flower Break

 

Another wordless Wednesday, which is typically a garden image coupled with a brief quote and thought. So digging through the photo archives this morning, I was hoping for something brilliant and bright. This coral variegated Geranium seemed perfect to accompany this Steve Maraboli quote, which sums up our Wednesday flower break best. “You’re frustrated because you keep waiting for the blooming of flowers of which you have yet to sow the seeds.” 

For anyone paying attention, the countdown to spring is next Wednesday. Let’s hope everyone is ready to start sowing seeds. Still need an in-your-face shot of pre-spring or just an extra push to start thinking gardens and seeds? Visit the Boston Flower and Garden Show; it starts today and runs until Sunday. This year’s theme – Seeds of Change. http://www.bostonflowershow.com/  

Image of a coral variegated Geranium by Ann Bilowz © (From our photo archives) 

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

 Happy Gardening. Annie 

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

When Following Makes Sense

 

Reviewing the recent results from the "2013 Residential Landscape Architecture Trends Survey," http://www.asla.org/NewsReleaseDetails.aspx?id=38451 one might realize that stopping in and following here makes sense. When trends indicate people are expanding their food and vegetable gardens to include orchards and vineyards (82.7 percent) you can check the archives for yourself. These are the very things we practice daily while incorporating it into the creative design process. 

When you live what you do, not just sell services, it’s only natural for it to become part of one's overall fabric. While the everyday blog talk can range on many topics, you typically find the use of native or drought-tolerant plants (83 percent), drip irrigation (82.5 percent), or many of the mentioned results from this survey blended within the daily text and images. We try to live our philosophy. We aren’t following trends but creating design with balance and harmony because we know it ourselves. We practice the one core element that is often overlooked in landscape architecture – being true stewards of the land. 

With that said, the regular followers know we don’t plug our own company; probably because self-promoting is not in our genes. This blog and all the social media (which changes much too frequently for this ‘digital immigrant’) has always been about connecting people to explore and get in touch with the outdoors. We’ve always believed that if you aren’t inspiring and educating people about what you do, if you aren’t getting someone charged up about plants, creating a sustainable site, using native materials above and beyond plants, then we are merely peddlers, not innovators, which I truly believe that landscape architects and designers should always strive to be. 

Anyone who knows us beyond social media, knows that we dance to a beat that is all our own. That's why we like to tell a story each day, like yesterday’s post. http://blog.bilowzassociates.com/2013/03/whats-face-of-your-farmer.html It’s meant to make you think about the face of your farmer plus give some attention to these unsung heroes.

So when does following make sense? We’ll leave it up to you but if you need a daily dose of something you can call part of your own home, we hope you’ll visit often and share this with your friends. And never underestimate the value of any outdoor space that brings you peace and comfort.

To wrap up with the daily quote, as Rita Mae Brown points out, “I think the reward for conformity is that everyone likes you except yourself.” So only follow when it makes sense.



Image from the archives by Ann Bilowz

Top image of our grape vines in the snow
Bottom image - grapes from our own vines ready for crushing

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Monday, March 11, 2013

What’s the Face of Your Farmer?

 

This past Saturday evening, we attended a talk about the ‘Face of the Farmer’ in our local town. The presentation took a peek at the historical aspects as well as a sampling of the local farms still in town today. Like many rural New England villages, once steeped in dairy, all are but gone to bigger pastures, therefore changing so many small towns’ farming face. But in its mooing days, this little town of Sterling with its premium milk took the highest prices in Boston.

Flash to present day: Now, there's a goat cheese farm not to be missed http://www.crystalbrookfarm.com/ because as one of the presenters mentioned, owners Ann and Eric Starbard are the real deal; farming is their living. And then there’s the story about my favorite ice cream place, Rota Spring Farm http://rotaspringfarm.com/ where folks travel from a distance to taste this incredible homemade ice cream. When the owner did a feasibility study for an ice cream stand, he was told, absolutely not. No one would travel a distance to this little rural town of Sterling to buy a scoop of ice cream. Ah, the important lesson of go by your instinct. Yes, there are folks like the Melones at Clearview Farm http://www.clearviewfarmstand.com/ who continue in the ag business despite its many challenges and setbacks. And as the presenter pointed out, despite that it is physically challenging, Rick always has a smile on his face. All of this unsung effort keeps the local small town farms still a part of quintessential New England. 

So to the 'Face of the Farmer', http://www.faceofthefarmer.org/ kudos for getting a standing room only crowd on a Saturday evening plus your unsung efforts to keep an eye on the face of our local farmer. For all those who visit and read today's blog, please post, share and describe the face of your farmer. Or as Douglas Adams once said, “I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer.” Do you know the face of your farmer? If not, you probably should.

If you recognize today’s image, it was taken on our recent mission trip. This is Rick Melone, the owner of Clearview Farm. Rick and his daughter, Lauren joined us on this mission, too.

Image by Greg Bilowz

And if you’d like to check back on an interesting article from an archived blog, http://blog.bilowzassociates.com/2010/11/no-farms-no-food.html it’s not only in these small rural towns in the United States where the face of the farmer is becoming obsolete.

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Happy Gardening. Annie 

Friday, March 8, 2013

The Wait to Get Outside

 
 
 Oh, just like the Agave plants, the Fig trees and other tenders that wait patiently inside, we are all ready to bust out of our pots and get back into the great outdoors. Unfortunately this lingering winter storm may mean a slower start to spring, which is only days away. As Ralph Waldo Emerson, a man who knew a thing or two about New England weather profoundly stated, “Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience.”


For all those impatient gardeners, a wake-up session may be necessary. These late season storms are fairly typical. But just in case your memory is shaky, here’s one from the archives to help you remember. http://blog.bilowzassociates.com/2011/04/snowy-slow-start-for-spring.html

Yes, this is a nudge and a reminder for the itchy gardener. Adopt the pace of nature if you’re just waiting to get outside. And if you need more tips, photos or ideas to inspire you, grab a cup of cocoa and browse through the Annie archives. Happy shoveling, snow piles that is but soon to be our favorite – the garden soil.


And don’t forget to practice that same patience on the roads - steady and slow.

All Images by Ann Bilowz

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Pruned Down and Branched Out

 

March is the time to reassess and evaluate, including your landscape. So here’s the Thursday health tip for those landscapes that may be worse for wear. It's no secret that high damaging winds and winter storms cause havoc to our plant materials. To keep things in tune, a regular checkup cannot be ignored. Here’s one from the Annie archives to remind everyone about the importance of a good prune. http://blog.bilowzassociates.com/2010/03/to-prune-or-not-to-prune.html

L.M. Montgomery pointed out, “I'm not a bit changed--not really. I'm only just pruned down and branched out. The real ME--back here--is just the same.” Make sure you do the proper pruning so your landscape looks fabulous this spring.

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Image of an Apple Tree in Need of a Good Prune by Ann Bilowz

Happy Gardening. Annie

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Put Your Signature on Today

 

Today is ‘Wordless Wednesday’ so it’s usually an image with a quote. Does it always relate to gardening or landscape design? Heck no!

Today’s choice: my signature rose that identifies this blog accompanied by an Apple quote. Well, you read it. Then make your wordless Wednesday what you will.

“Here's to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They're not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can't do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.” ~ Apple Inc.

Annie’s Signature Rose – Image by Greg Bilowz ©

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Happy Gardening. Annie

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Save the Date in May

 

When you can’t see color on these dull March days, time to save a date for something spectacular that happens every May; at least for those New Englanders that is. When all of us seem color blind from winter’s dullness, perhaps it's time for a refresher course on some brilliant colors and something to set your senses on fire.

So save this date in May. Schedule your time for Lilac Sunday at the Arnold Arboretum, May 12, 2013. And if you need further convincing, here’s one from the archives to refresh the color blind memory with this favorite blossom of spring. http://blog.bilowzassociates.com/2010/03/sweet-scent-of-lilacs.html

Lilacs in New England are as big as cherry blossoms in DC. As Ivan Albright pointed out, “A color is as strong as the impression it creates.”


And if you think this above image is a Cherry Blossom, here's the link for more info on this tad unusual Lilac to add to your color repertoire this spring. http://blog.bilowzassociates.com/2012/05/time-to-fert-lime.html
Lilac Images by Ann Bilowz ©

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Happy Gardening. Annie

Monday, March 4, 2013

The Spirit of March




Mark Twain once said, “A few fly bites cannot stop a spirited horse.” But before you saddle up for spring and get into the garden overalls, it might be wise to enjoy the peaceful outdoors minus those pestering fly bites. But then again, the die-hard garden lovers are a bit like a spirited horse.

Still, March can tease even the most optimistic and get us stuck in the mud. It can be an up and down, transition month because we can’t quite get outside and dig in the soil. On this sunny start of a Monday morning, here’s a helpful hint for all - brush up with a class or a workshop. It can be that lifesaver before you saddle up for spring.
 
There’s so many at your fingertips to get you into the swing of gardening and outdoor thinking. March is the month for flower shows so there’s inspiration in a snap. And if you’re looking for something to still inspire you during the month of April showers, here's a chance to join us. The links below provide all the details; two different topics with two different locations. Any questions, comments or suggestions, you know how to reach me.

April 20th, 2013 4:00 5:30 PM ‘The Influence of British Gardens from Across the Pond’ http://www.thecozyteacart.com/events/events_more_info_2013_04_20.asp

April 27th, 2013 1-4PM ‘Landscape Design and Construction Q & A https://dnbweb1.blackbaud.com/OPXREPHIL/EventDetail.asp?cguid=C7E2C131%2DAD0F%2D49AA%2DB073%2D5B92F8300A37&eid=45183 

Image of spring bulbs ready to pop by Ann Bilowz

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Happy Gardening. Annie

Friday, March 1, 2013

Friday’s Insight

 

Arnold Glasgow states that “An idea not coupled with action will never get any bigger than the brain cell it occupied.” So what’s in store as these ‘Five Inspired Ideas Emerging from TED2013’ become bigger than the brain cell it occupied? http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidhochman/2013/02/28/five-inspired-ideas-emerging-from-ted2013/

It’s just a Friday insight as one swirls in these higher levels of technological think tanks. Does anyone besides me ever wonder where the earth and all its magnificent beauty comes into play? As Christopher Lloyd once shared, “Many gardeners will agree that hand-weeding is not the terrible drudgery that it is often made out to be. Some people find in it a kind of soothing monotony. It leaves their minds free to develop the plot for their next novel or to perfect the brilliant repartee with which they should have encountered a relative's latest example of unreasonableness.” It’s just a few thoughts to ponder over the weekend as we float softly into the beauty of spring. 

A favorite image of mine from the archives – Image by Ann Bilowz

If you like this blog, hope you check in daily. You can like our fan page at http://www.facebook.com/abilowz or follow on twitter http://twitter.com/annbilowz or subscribe on the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at annbilowz@gmail.com You can now follow with visuals on Pinterest, too! http://pinterest.com/bilowzassoc/

Happy Gardening. Annie

About Me

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Check in for your daily share's worth of garden inspiration, landscape architecture and design tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! We invite you to contact Bilowz Associates, Inc., or to browse our portfolios. Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. You can follow with visuals on Pinterest and find us on LinkedIn and Houzz, too.  You can also find us back on our Google+ Business Page. (Landscape architects/Landscape Design/serving Massachusetts and New England.) Visit our landscape architectural design firm's website where creating design with balance and harmony is our story. http://www.bilowzassociates.com/

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© 2009 Ann St. Jean-Bilowz/Bilowz Associates Inc. (including all photographs, unless otherwise noted in Annie's Gardening Corner are the property of Bilowz Associates Inc. and shall not be reproduced in any manner nor are they to be assigned to any third party without the expressed written permission and consent of Bilowz Associates Inc.)